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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

HAMILTON, ON – Can music and hearing loss go together? MIRA and HPO to explore that question at downtown Hamilton event. The Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra (HPO) and the McMaster Institute for Research on Aging (MIRA) are partnering next week to examine whether music and aging-related hearing loss can go together. This engaging multidisciplinary talk will feature the music of Beethoven, and explore how his life evolved due to his own struggles with deafness.

Music and Hearing Loss: Can they go together? will be held on Tuesday, October 9, 2018 from 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. at the Hamilton Public Library (Central Location, Hamilton Room, 55 York Blvd). It is second in a public series developed by MIRA and the HPO, in collaboration with the McMaster Institute for Music and the Mind (MIMM) and the Hamilton Public Library (HPL), to explore synergies between aging and music.

“We are excited to continue our partnership with the HPO, which allows us to share research insights on topics of interest members of the community while working alongside an organization with a long history of engagement with older adults,” said Laura Harrington, Managing Director of MIRA.

Guests will be treated over the lunch hour to musical performances by HPO’s String Quartet and a joint presentation by HPOs Composer-in-Residence Abigail Richardson-Schulte and Dr. Dan Bosnyak, Technical Director from McMaster’s LIVELab

“Beethoven’s world became increasingly isolated throughout his life, but, through this, his music gained an unparalleled freedom and originality. On October 9th, guests will learn about the different stages of Beethoven’s life and hearing loss, paired with the transcendent music he wrote during these times,” said Richardson-Schulte. Bosnyak, a McMaster University scientist who studies age-related hearing loss, tinnitus, and hearing aid technology, will present a scientific perspective on why hearing loss occurs and how musical listening is impacted by this loss.

MIRA is committed to sharing groundbreaking research and educational initiatives in aging at McMaster University with members of the community through public events such as this, as well as through public platforms, like the McMaster Optimal Aging Portal.

This event is free and open to the public. Registration is not required, but is strongly encouraged as space is limited. Register online at musicandhearing.eventbrite.ca.

About McMaster Institute for Research on Aging (MIRA) 

The McMaster Institute for Research on Aging (MIRA) aims to optimize the longevity of Canada’s aging population through research, education, and collaboration. Interdisciplinary teams work alongside older adults and key stakeholders to find ways that will help Canadians spend more years living well. MIRA also acts as an entry point to some of McMaster’s existing research platforms in aging, including the Labarge Centre for Mobility in Aging and the McMaster Optimal Aging Portal. For more information visit mira.mcmaster.ca


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About the HPO: The Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra was founded in 1884 as The Hamilton Orchestral Society and grew to become one of Canada’s major professional orchestras. Today, the HPO is a leader in Hamilton’s robust arts community where it provides professional orchestral services and music education programs to address the needs of the community. The HPO continues to commission and premiere works and is one of the artistic jewels of the Hamilton area. The combined musical talents of its artists continue to enrich the community and enhance the quality of life for its residents.    

Media Contacts:

Christina Volpini
Marketing and Communications Coordinator
Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra
905.526.1677 X 226
cvolpini@hpo.org

Kim Varian
Director, Development and Communications
Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra
905.526.1677 x222
kvarian@hpo.org

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